Cayenne

Cayenne – Antiviral, Antibacterial, Anti-Fungal, and Anti-Inflammatory

Cayenne pepper is known to have many different kinds of components. These include antioxidants as well as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial properties. All you have to do to experience cayenne’s wonderful health benefits is to sprinkle some cayenne pepper into your morning drink.

 

 

Cayenne – Inflammation

The heat emanating from cayenne pepper actually helps lower the heat of inflammation in the body when it’s ingested. Cayenne and other hot peppers contain a compound referred to as capsaicin. These helps block the COX-2 enzyme that contributes to the inflammation process associated with arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

 

Cayenne – Necrosis (Gangrene)

Gangrene, especially wet gangrene, can spread very quickly and can be fatal. It can be caused by a sudden interruption of blood circulation, like with burns, freezing or blood clots. Affected tissues may appear badly bruised swollen, or blistered, and may also become infected. If possible, treat the underlying cause of the gangrene.

To stop the spread of gangrene, apply a cayenne (capsicum) infusion to the affected area, or take it orally. In case of infection, apply colloidal silver to the affected area, and take zell oxygen orally as well.

Other remedies for necrosis include:

Olive Leaf

Bayberry

Echinacea

Gingko

Goldenseal

Red seal

 

Cayenne – Stiff Arthritic Joints, Low Back Pain, Heart Tonic, Reduce Cholesterol, muscle Pain, Fibromyalgia, Arthritis and Nerve Pain

The stimulating properties and the heat that comes from cayenne peppers are similar to a jump start to an engine on a cold morning. It brings life back into your sore muscles and help your heart beat a bit faster, helping to increase blood circulation all over the body.

The heat of cayenne also helps warm stiff arthritic joints and eases lower back pain. The longer you use cayenne, the more effective it gets. In addition, cayenne-infused oils don’t burn your skin as much as capsaicin creams, and cayenne salves and oils are often recommended for people who have problems with pain. However, cayenne has many other kinds of uses, making it one of the most potent remedies available.

When it comes to pain relief, cayenne pepper extracts are an important part of herbal treatment for muscle pain, which also includes fibromyalgia, arthritis and the nerve pain caused by shingles and sciatica. It appears to act by lowering the concentration of substance P, the primary chemical used by nerve cells to transmit pain signals. It takes continued use over a period of time (at least a couple of weeks) to feel this benefit. In addition, cayenne is rich in salicylates, natural aspirin-like compounds, which contribute more to its analgesic nature.

Cayenne pepper balms, oils and creams are considered to be rubefacients, meaning they help warm the body by quickly dilating small capillaries, and increasing blood circulation, which reddens (but doesn’t burn) the skin. Also, the increase in blood circulation is the hallmark of cayenne’s effect on the body; it helps stimulate the heart and lungs, increasing blood circulation and warming the whole body.

Cayenne, along with other peppers, have been proven to help strengthen digestion and reduce the changes of bacterial infections from unsanitary food and water. Cayenne peppers also helps lessen the gas and bloating that comes from heavy eating and greasy foods. Cayenne also helps boost your metabolism and induces the body to burn more fat. In general, eating spicy foods help to decrease your appetite and increase satiety, so you’re inclined to eat less.

Capsaicin, the most potent constituent of cayenne, has been shown to be effective when it comes to treating psoriasis symptoms. Treatment does help produce burning sensations, which are normal and decrease with repeated use. A 1999 study found that treatment with capsaicin caused a marked reduction in psoriasis activity and decrease formation of new skin plaques.

When it comes to heart health, cayenne is considered to be a valuable heart tonic. These hot peppers contain capsicum which has been proven to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Cayenne also helps to increase circulation and keeps the blood flowing smoothly through veins and arteries. In addition, cayenn is high in antioxidants, rounding out its cardiovascular benefits.

Preparation Methods and Dosage:

Cayenne powder is used to make liniments and herbal oils. Cayenne extracts can be taken in capsule and liquid form, while both fresh and dry cayenne peppers are used in cooking. This stimulating spice is rarely used as a single ingredient for tea, but is added to herbal blends in little amounts, generally less than 1/8th teaspoon. You can also sprinkle cayenne powder on cuts, scrapes and abrasions to help stop the bleeding. Contrary to what you may think, it doesn’t burn. In addition, capsicum extracts are used in OTC analgesics rubs and creams.

Hot, stimulating cayenne peppers are like a jump start to a cold car engine on a cold morning. It brings welcome life into sore muscles and get your heart to beat faster, increasing blood flow throughout the body. The heat of cayenne warms stiff, arthritic joints and helps relax lower back pain. The longer you use it, the better it works. Making it one of the most powerful remedies in your kitchen medicine cabinet.

CAYENNE FOR PAIN RELIEF
Cayenne pepper extracts is an integral part of herbal treatment for muscle pain, fibromyalgia, arthritis and the nerve pain caused by shingles and sciatica. It appears to act by lowering the concentration of substance P, the main chemical used by nerve cells to transmit pain signals. It should take repeated usage over a period of a few weeks to feel this benefit.

Furthermore, cayenne is also rich in salicylates, natural aspirin-like compounds, which add to its analgesic nature. In addition, cayenne pepper balms, oils and creams are rubefacients, meaning it helps warm the body by quickly dilating smal capillaries, and increasing blood circulation, which reddens (but not burn) the skin. Lastly, this increase in circulation is the hallmark of cayenne’s effect on the body, it stimulates the heart, and the lungs as well as increasing blood circulation and warmth all over your system.

CAYENNE PEPPER DIET
Adding cayenne to your diet is a no-brainer. Cayenne, along with other peppers, strengthen digestion and lessen the chance of bacterial infections from unsanitary food and water. Cayenne peppers also help lessen the gas and bloating that comes from heavy, greasy foods. In addition, it can also help boost your metabolism which helps lower appetite and increase satiety, so you’re inclined to eat less. Lastly, seasoning with this pepper helps lessen the need for salt and fat in cooking without sacrificing the flavor.

PSORIASIS TREATMENT
Capsaicin, the most potent compound found in cayenne, has been shown to be effective in treating psoriasis symptoms. Treatment does produce a burning sensation, which are normal and decrease with repeated use. If you buy OTC medications, look for one that has menthol, it will help ease the itching as well. A 1999 study found that treatment with capsaicin caused a significant decrease in psoriasis activity and a lowered formation of new skin plaques.

HEART HEALTH
Cayenne is considered to be a valuable heart tonic. These hot peppers also contain capsicum which has been shown to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Cayenne also helps to increase circulation and keeps the blood flowing smoothly through veins and arteries. Cayenne is also high in antioxidants, rounding out its cardiovascular benefits.

PREPARATION METHODS AND DOSAGE
Cayenne powder is used to make ligaments and herbal oils. Cayenne extracts can be consumed in either capsul or liquid form. Both fresh and dry cayenne peppers are also used in cooking. This stimulating soice is rarely used as a single ingredient tea, but is added to herbal blends in small amounts, generally about less than 1/8th teaspoon.

Sprinkle cayenne powder on cuts, scrapes and abrasions to help stop bleeding. Contrary to what you may think, it doesn’t burn at all. Plus, capsicum extracts are used in OTC analgesic rubs and creams.

Author: Serena

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